Clay County Animal Services seeking public’s help; kennels remain full

Zoey Fields

The Clay County Animal Shelter has been at maximum capacity since the beginning of May, and the issue remains – the shelter is reaching out to the county and media partners to help spread awareness of the need for adoptions.

The shelter has strong partnerships with foster families, rescue organizations, off-site adoption locations, and other local shelters, which has contributed to its high success rate. Animals are routinely transferred to other shelters or rescue organizations; however, all shelters are at capacity and that is not an option right now, Clay County Public Information Officer Annaleasa Winter said.

Clay County Animal Services is a 90% live-release-rate shelter, which places them in the no-kill category of animal services. The Clay shelter, located at 3984 State Road 16 West, Green Cove Springs, takes in between 3,200 and 3,500 animals on average each year, Winter said.

The shelter staff members are flexible and will work with anyone who wants to take an animal home on a trial basis, she said. There are opportunities for day outings to take fido for a cheeseburger and go to a dog park, overnight or weekend sleepovers with the family, holiday fostering during Thanksgiving and Christmas and long-term foster care or medical fostering to get animals ready for adoption outside of the shelter environment.

Additionally, the shelter’s Bow Wow Breakout Club is a way for families to tend to an animal on a trial basis without being registered foster parents. Those interested provide a government ID and are given a backpack with supplies needed for the period the pet will be with the family.

The program is open to all dogs and some cats depending on their temperament. It can be beneficial for cats that are shy in the shelter environment or those that need socialization to make them better candidates for adoption, Winter said.

To sign-up or learn more about the Bow Wow Breakout Club, click here.

“Typically, the adoption rate after an animal has been with a foster family is high,” Winter said. “An animal in foster care is ten times more likely to be adopted because the basic training and socialization provided outside the shelter make them a better family pet.”

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=1NvDz3_0gZEUga800
Clay County Public Information Officer Annaleasa Winter with an adoptable cat at the animal shelter.Clay County Government

The Clay County Animal Shelter has strong partnerships with foster families, rescue organizations, off-site adoption locations and other local shelters, which has contributed to its high success adoption-rate.

Animals are routinely transferred to other shelters or rescue organizations; however, all shelters are at capacity and that option is not available.

The shelter also has a strong foster program in place where residents can be long-term foster families and work to get their foster animals adopted from their homes. All medical care is provided through Animal Services at no cost to the foster families.

Shelter staff also provide the tools and resources families need to help keep their pets in their foster homes as opposed to surrendering them to a shelter or abandoning them, Winter said. They provide food, information on low-cost veterinary services, information on rehoming, pet-friendly housing information, help with behavioral problems and more.

For more information about fostering an animal, click here.

For more information about adoptions or to see adoptable animals, click here or call 904-529-4107.

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Accredited journalist with experience covering a wide range of stories consisting of breaking news, city and county government, crime and courts, feature stories and local interest. Facebook Bulletin writer, reporter; The Learning Curve. Twitter: @zoeyfields0

Jacksonville, FL
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