The Mysterious People of Diminutive Stature Who Inhabited Skara Brae 5000 Years Ago

Yana Bostongirl

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ScotlandPhoto byPhoto by Bjorn Snelders

Stories about dwarf species of human beings have been circulating for a long time, however, they have often been dismissed as ancient fiction. The discovery of a hobbit-like human species approximately the size of a 3-year-old in 2004 has had researchers and naysayers alike rethink the fact that little people did actually exist and thrive in various parts of the world, like Scotland, Hawaii, and Indonesia.

Skara Brae, located in the Scottish Orkney Archipelago, was once home to Hobbit-like people of diminutive stature. It is considered to be even older than Stonehenge and the Great Pyramids of Egypt.

The settlement consists of a cluster of 8 prehistoric dwellings that have had people scratching their heads on account of its dimensions as this excerpt explains: "These eight little dwellings came complete with stone beds, a central hearth, shell midden insulation, and indoor toilets draining outwards from the structures, but most interesting of all, are the dimensions of the doors and beds. The doorways and beds barely reach four feet, and so, the only logical conclusion to make from these dimensions is that the inhabitants were indeed diminutive in stature."

What is even stranger is that these Neolithic homes were located underground. Per reports, they were hidden under a mound until a great storm annihilated it in 1850.

It was not until 1927 that these dwellings were officially investigated and even then the mystery deepens as this excerpt explains: "Then the site was allegedly looted of many artifacts in 1913 AD, and it was not “officially” studied until 1927 AD by the University of Edinburgh. Professor Gordon Childe came to the feeble conclusion that this site dated to 500 BC, but this was obviously incorrect and in the seventies, material from the site was carbon-dated to 3180 BC."

A manuscript written by the Bishop of Orkney in 1493 suggests that when the King of Norway, Harald Haarfagre, conquered Orkney in the 9th century, it was inhabited by the short-statured Papae and the Picts who were exterminated by persons unknown.

In his book titled “From External Influences on English: From Its Beginnings to the Renaissance,” D. Gary Miller describes the Papae and the Picts as follows: "The pre-Scandinavian inhabitants of Orkney were Papae (means: ‘clerics’) and Pati, which means ‘Picts’ (so ancient Romans called the tribes of today's Scotland), who were a race of small-statured people."

Skara Brae along with a group of other similar sites has since been designated as the Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site.

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