5 Women Leaders That Are Paving the Way for Young Women

Sulabh Gupta

The world celebrated International Women’s day last month on March 08th and although there is still a long way to go, it is heartwarming to see the progress that our society has made towards women's rights. Women around the world are succeeding and are becoming more and more influential.

While women from the business world are appreciated a lot, there is no doubt that every woman who juggles several roles to be a mother, homemaker, or any other role that requires sacrifice shall be appreciated every day.

Here is a list of 5 remarkable women that are inspiring the future women leader of the world.

1. Kamala Harris, Vice President of the United States

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Image Source: Office of Kamala Harris

Kamala Harris became the first female vice president of the United States. Even before she became the vice president, she was a successful lawyer and senator and has often stood up against racism against people of color. There is no doubt that over the next few years young women around the world will look up to Kamala Harris.

Kamala Harris has given us many inspiring quotes but my personal favorite is

“Anyone who claims to be a leader must speak like a leader. That means speaking with integrity and truth”

2. Jacinda Ardern, Prime Minister of New Zealand

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Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Jacinda Ardern was the world’s youngest female head of state. She was elected as the Prime Minister of New Zealand at the young age of 37. She gave birth to her first daughter during her first term. Ardern was widely appreciated for her major speeches carrying her young daughter in her lap. Talk about juggling work and parenthood. New Zealand handled the Covid-19 pandemic very well with only 26 deaths in the country and most of it was thanks to the measures taken by Jacinda Ardern.

“Even the ugliest of viruses can exist in places they are not welcome. Racism exists, but it is not welcome here. Because we are not immune to the viruses of hate, of fear, of others. We never have been. But we can be the nation that discovers the cure,” Jacinda Ardern on Racism.

3. Sonia Syngal, President and CEO of Gap

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Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sonia Syngal became the CEO of Gap just before the Covid-19 Pandemic started which was undoubtedly a very difficult time for retail but even during these uncertain times, she successfully expanded her team. She is one of the few female CEOs of Fortune 500 and one of the highest-ranking Indian American female CEO. She has also led Old Navy to be the first Fortune 500 company to disclose and validate its pay equality practices. Sonia has a master's degree in Manufacturing Systems Engineering from Stanford University and a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from Kettering University.

4. Kathrin Jansen, Head of Vaccine Research and Development at Pfizer

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Image Source: Pfizer

During this Covid-19 pandemic, one woman made an impact without making it to major news networks. The task assigned to Kathrin Jansen’s team was a nearly impossible one - to create and test a viable COVID-19 vaccine in less than a year. Traditionally it used to take 5-10 years to get a new vaccine but the world didn’t have that luxury during this pandemic. Achieving this task required taking risks including using unproven mRNA technology. Her bold move and hard work by her team under her leadership led to a breakthrough and the world got the Pfizer vaccine.

5. Malala Yousafzai, World’s Youngest Nobel Prize Winner

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Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

“One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world.” - Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai has been an advocate for girl's education from a very young age. She won a Nobel Prize in Peace in 2014 at the age of 17 making her the youngest recipient of this honor. She was shot in the left side of her face at the age of 15 when she started speaking out against the Taliban’s ban on female education. The attack didn’t stir her and she set up the Malala Fund, a charity dedicated to allowing every girl to achieve their ideal future.

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