What Pineapple Pizza Taught Me

Sira M.

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Pineapple pizza - also known as Hawaiian pizza. Everyone hates it. I’m mad about it. And I’m probably the only Italian who likes it. My Italian friends tell me I’m crazy, but still, I love it, I can’t help it. I tried it in Los Angeles years ago and fell in love with it.

However, it might surprise you to learn that the main subject of this article is not whether pineapple pizza is worth trying or not. And it’s not how to prepare it.

The purpose of this piece is to tell you what pineapple pizza taught me — and what you can learn from it too.

At this moment, I’m doing something most people are not comfortable doing. I’m sharing my opinion when I know most people will disagree. I’m saying out loud I love pineapple pizza, when I know almost everyone hates it.

I see this often: If everyone follows the same trend, most people will avoid disagreeing and follow the trend too.

Even the most skeptical often convince themselves they think like the rest of the crowd, or they have the same taste in something. Because they are afraid of what others may think of them — or what they will tell them.

Many are usually afraid to express their opinion when they know everyone will disagree with their idea.

And this is what happens with pineapple pizza.

Everyone says they hate it because everyone says they hate it.

But out of all the pineapple pizza haters, how many do actually hate it, in your opinion? I say a good 30% of them haven’t even tried it.

“There are two groups of people: Herds and individual clever people. Because herds have numerical superiority, individual clever people remain weak in determining the right fate for the country! The solution: Disperse the herds, augment the individuals!”
Mehmet Murat Ildan

“So What?” Is the Answer

If you express your opinion, regardless of what others think, the worst that can happen is someone will communicate their disagreement. However, the reality is, what you're doing is being true to yourself.

When someone communicates their disagreement, they might do it respectfully, or they might do it in a rude way. They might attack you verbally, or they might even try to make fun of you in front of others. They might do all this just because you expressed your thoughts. And because they didn't learn to respect other people's opinions.

So my question is: Do you really care about what they think?

Do you really care about the opinion of someone who's not able to respect yours?

When this happens, all I do is telling myself: “Ok, this person doesn’t agree with me. So what?”

If someone is not respecting my opinion — and trying to make me feel bad for expressing it — I even say it out loud: “You don’t agree with my opinion. Fine, I'll move on."

And this is exactly what pineapple pizza taught me. To stand up for myself, even when I know everyone is going to disagree.

“The eyes of others our prisons; their thoughts our cages.” ― Virginia Woolf

How to Deal With Other People's Opinion

I don't know about you, but I think other people’s opinion of us is none of our business. Their opinion doesn't define who we are, they define who they are. It can help us grow and become better sometimes, but still, we should know which opinion is worth listening to and which not.

Here are some ways you can deal with other people's opinions about you.

1. Always listen to them, then decide if you should give them importance or not.

2. Learn to distinguish constructive feedback from someone who doesn't respect your point of view.

3. Don't be afraid of expressing your ideas, even when they're unpopular. If someone can't respect your ideas, it's their problem.

4. Don't take anything personally.

“Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else’s opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation.”— Oscar Wilde

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Writer | Coach | Proud Amazonian | https://www.linkedin.com/in/sirams/

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