A Strong Solar Flare Hit the Earth, NASA Says Its Consequences Are Very Interesting

Roxana Anton

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Lately, our Sun is very active.

Climate change is one of the most crucial topics of this latest period. The various transformations are leading to increasingly dangerous situations.

The Sun is getting hotter. Exposing your skin to its rays does not always bring benefits.

As informed by esquire.com, in the last two weeks the sun has released a powerful coronal mass ejection: an explosion of plasma. That is going to invest our magnetic field.

The consequences of these emissions from the star that brings heat and light to the earth are very concrete: they damage electronic systems and interfere in radio communications.

After traveling 150 million kilometers, these storms can damage our satellites, electronic devices and disrupt radio communications.

If these explosions come one after the other, they can become even more problematic. The strongest ever recorded dates back to 1859.

More information here and here.

NASA has estimated that such an event today would bring up to 130 million people to the United States without electricity, with impaired water distribution, perishable foods and drugs lost in 12-24 hours, loss of heating/air conditioning, problems with sewers, telephone service, refueling and so on.

According to spaceweatherlife.com, the moderate G2 geomagnetic storm conditions make aurora visible all over Sweden, Scotland, and even The Netherlands, to name a couple of places.

The Bz did turn northward around midnight UTC, but later in the night and morning, the Bz dipped southward for a couple of hours going as low as -18nT. Together with the high solar wind speed, it caused strong G3 geomagnetic storm conditions (the second G3 storm of this Solar Cycle) and sparked a beautiful aurora at many locations in Canada and the northern USA. Our friends down under in New Zealand also got a great show! (source: https://www.spaceweatherlive.co)

The moderate G2 geomagnetic storm conditions make aurora visible all over Sweden, Scotland, and even The Netherlands to just name a couple of places.
The Bz did turn mostly northward around midnight UTC, but later in the night and morning, the Bz dipped southward for a couple of hours going as low as -18nT. This, together with the high solar wind speed, caused strong G3 geomagnetic storm conditions (the second G3 storm of this Solar Cycle) and sparked truly amazing aurora at many locations in Canada and the northern USA. Our friends down under in New Zealand also got a great show! (source: https://www.spaceweatherlive.co)

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