Lessons from the Iconic Couple John F. Kennedy Jr. and Carolyn Bessette

Roxana Anton

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John F. Kennedy Jr. and Carolyn Bessette Kennedy died 22 years ago, in a plane crash off Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts — an unspeakable American and even, we might say global tragedy.

They were an iconic couple that must be remembered from time to time, for what they represented, and the lessons they can still teach us today.

She was the Calvin Klein PR VIP girl who famously captured the heart of the former president's son in the early nineties.

He was famous by birth, being the son of President Kennedy and Jacqueline Kennedy, later Onassis.

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Carolyn became famous by marrying him.

She always tried to escape the press's excessive attention, badly disoriented by the constant hunting from the paparazzi.

The couple was permanently on show, both at fashionable Manhattan events, and on their travels to visit celebrities such as Mariuccia Mandelli and Gianni Versace. Carolyn also complained to her friend, journalist Jonathan Soroff, that she could not get a job without being accused of exploiting her fame. (source: Wikipedia)

They were one of New York's most famous couple, still managing to preserve that aura of myth, mystery, and privacy.

They weren't selling their private lives, as it happens today.

Even more, Carolyn was not trying to show off, or take advantage of her famous position. She preserved a very simple, classic, linear style, with a wardrobe that consisted of simple, neutral tones of beige, grey, white, and black.

All that was speaking effortlessly, and came from luxury and worth.

The couple was probably the most famous at their time in the political and affluent circles but knew and cherished the value of personal freedom and private life.

Carolyn didn't seem to want or to take much privilege or advantage from her new fame.

Actually, she seemed embarrassed about it.

She still worked and earned her life as normal people do. It wasn't a job for her to be famous and in the eye of the paparazzi all the time.

Carolyn had what was called the laidback luxury, something we are not very familiarized with today, in the Social Media era.

While on today's Instagram everything must be cured in minimal detail, and everything has to be so perfect, back then you could relax and just enjoy life, without being so fancy about it.

The style is called Laidback Luxe. Carolyn and John F. Kennedy Jr. were some of its best representatives.

Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy was a 90s fashion icon and, just like her mother-in-law, Jackie, an icon of the New York style. (source: harpersbazaar.com)

In a strict palette of monochrome and neutrals, Carolyn was often called the queen of the 1990s.

Her style was this laidback, relaxed glamour, made of simple cuts with gold accessories and distinguished femininity and grace.

If you look for pictures of her, you barely recognize today's Instagram models.

Maximum simplicity was what distinguished her, even at evening events and parties.

It would be interesting if someone could bring into attention and even try to revival her style.

It very much reminds me of Audrey Hepburn and her refined, simple, almost monochrome style.

Their tragic death marked the end of a particular kind of celebrity culture. The end of privacy and personal life is viewed as important and necessary to protect, rather than curate and then monetize. (source: viva.co)

In their time, discretion and privacy were qualities that still needed to be preserved.

Quite opposite to what happens today.

The destiny plaid them a trick that's even too hard to imagine. As it was said before, by dying so young, only in their thirties, John and Carolyn were the people who had everything in life, except life itself.

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I bring you news of general interest from trustful sources. Freelance writer, translator, and novelist.

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