How to Create Your Own Happiness in a Single-Step Routine

Riley Blue

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Recreate

Yes, you won’t get the same friends, that same scenery, or the exact same ambiance that you had during those times. But when you break it down to the microelements, you can surely recreate the magic of that phase.

Recreating those micro-habits will be different for every person. But here are the things I did, which have also been proven by science to have an immense uplifting effect on your general mood throughout the day.

The trick is in being active

I realized I used to walk a lot and spend hours playing table tennis when I was in college. Now, I barely manage 8000 steps each day.

And so, I made it a point to include more physical activity in my life. I built myself a standing desk, did Yoga in the morning, HIIT in the evening, and went for a walk in the afternoons. It’s amazing how relaxed this daily dose of exercise made me feel.

Expanding your circle of support

I also texted and called my old friends frequently. Until a few weeks ago, I used to internalize all my problems, talking only to my closest friends. But now, as I reconnected with my college friends, I started talking about major problems and upcoming decisions of my life with them.

It felt a little odd at first, but having a larger support circle makes everything so much easier.

Switching up the scenes

Since most of us spend all day in our homes or offices and don’t get any change of scenery during the day, it can have a huge impact on our mental health. Researchers from New York University and the University of Miami found that having new, diverse experiences every day is linked to positive emotions and enhanced happiness.

“Something as simple as introducing variety in our daily routines may be enough to increase our sense of well-being. People feel happier when they have more variety in their daily routines — when they go to novel places and have a wider array of experiences,” — Catherine Hartley, Assistant professor of psychology and neural science at New York University.

I implemented this during the lockdown times by working in different corners of my house. When I felt annoyed, I took a small break and stared out the window. Then, I dragged my table to another area or took my laptop to work from my couch. This sounds simple, but the impact it had on my overall mood was huge.

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