2 Difficult Books Worth Reading

Riley Blue

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1. Daemon by Daniel Suarez

A computer program equipped with the deadliest weapons and having zero remorse: how far will it go before crashing the entire world down?

Why it’s so hard to read

I’m not a programmer or a hacker. It’s difficult to understand most of what’s happening. Thankfully, the author provides an explanation for the technical jargon, even though sometimes all the information might feel overwhelming.

The scope of the book is mind-boggling, and the number of characters sometimes might require you to take notes to remember who’s who.

Why you should read it anyway

Looking at some of the reviews, I was worried if this book might be too difficult for me to understand. But once I started, the addictive narrative didn’t let me stop even for a while.

The premise might sound far-fetched, but the execution is amazing. The book is one hell of an adrenaline-pumping ride into what could happen if humans let technology overpower them, and all the ways science could come back to haunt us if we’re not careful. It raises some important questions about the price we pay to have an “easy” life. What if all the technological advancement comes back to bite us in the ass?

A computer program equipped with the deadliest weapons and having zero remorse: how far will it go before crashing the entire world down?

2. Annihilation of Caste by B. R. Ambedkar

Genre: Philosophical/religious/political manifesto

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India is a land blinded by customs and rituals. The caste system that divides the people into four castes — the Brahmins, Kshatriyas, Vaishyas, and Shudras — continues to play a major role in the social dynamics of the country. The higher caste people shun the lower castes, often refusing to touch them or breathe the same air as they do. This practice was rampant in pre-Independence India and is still practiced in some villages across the country.

Dr. B. R. Ambedkar — the man who drafted the Indian constitution — was born in the lowest caste and rose to a position of immense power and influence. He faced some unique challenges because of his birth and stature that led him to despise Hindusim as a whole and turn to Buddhism for respite.

If one finds no meaning in following their religion, is there anything wrong in switching to one that respects them more?

Often at loggerheads with the “Father of the nation,” Mahatma Gandhi, Ambedkar outlines his journey of renouncing the religion he was born into and embracing Buddhism. He lays down in great detail everything that’s wrong with Hinduism and how the ancient Hindu scriptures were misinterpreted to benefit only one section of the society while alienating and dehumanizing the other.

Why it’s so hard to read

The language can get dry and bitter at times, with the author’s personal bias seeping through. Try reading it with a neutral mindset, though, and you’ll be surprised. However, if you’re a lover of languages and well-written prose, this book makes it hard to concentrate.

Why you should read it anyway

About one in every seven people in the world is an Indian. The country has a rich and varied history, with a penchant for the rich and powerful to dominate the poor and helpless. This book is a brutally honest look into what it means to belong to one of the lowest classes.

Even if you’ve never faced something similar, it’s important to familiarize yourself with the collective history of a people so downtrodden, the most hard-hearted fantasy reader would flinch. Dr. Ambedkar outlines the atrocities his people were forced to, and the constant struggle to empower them through his work. He also raises some important questions:

  • Why should someone’s stature by birth be considered more valuable than their life’s work?
  • One has the liberty to change their religion. Why can’t one change their caste?
  • If one finds no meaning in following their religion, is there anything wrong in switching to one that respects them more?

Final Words

I’m not a huge fan of non-fiction books or techno-thrillers. But these three books worked their way into my heart and made a permanent place for themselves there. If you’re looking for a book to positively impact your life, pick one from this list and start reading.

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