One Nurse's Point of View on Life, Death, and Selflessness During The Pandemic

Rick Martinez RN

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=1IDAFt_0eZ765On00
Photo by Cedric Fauntleroy from Pexels

As nurses, we are privy to some of the most intimate moments a person will ever experience.

We are witnesses to the joys and sorrows of life, and often times we are the only ones who offer comfort in a time of need. We are both caregivers and friends, and we touch people's lives in ways that many never even realize.

This is why I love being a nurse; it's more than just a job; it's a calling.

We're more than just caregivers

We are so much more than simple caregivers.

We are the ones who offer hope in a time of darkness and a shoulder to cry on when nobody else is available. We are the ones who listen when others won't, and we never judge no matter what the circumstance. We are the light in somebody's dark world, and we make a difference in people's lives every single day.

So if you're ever feeling down or like your life doesn't matter, remember that it does.

You matter to somebody, and that somebody is me, us - a nurse who cares for you more than you could ever possibly know.

We're privy to some of the most intimate human moments

Like Death

People die.

You and I both know that it's a basic fact of life.

Death, I mean.

And just because I'm a nurse doesn't mean that I am impacted less. Or that I'm less sensitive.

In fact, it's the exact opposite.

It's never easy.

Seeing death, I mean.

One second you're desperately trying to revive someone, and the next, you're seeing life leave their eyes. I mean, you're like literally working your buns off, trying everything you know and have been taught, oft in a futile effort to give someone an extra hour. Or an extra day...of life.

The worst part is when you make an effort, but in the deepest parts of you're being, you know it won't help.

You know they've already gone.

And Life

Then there are the moments of joy.

The moments when you catch a baby as they take their first breath. Or when you see the relief on a patient's face as the pain finally starts to dissipate.

It's those moments that make it all worth it.

The tough days and the long nights.

Those moments when you know you've made a difference.

When you've touched somebody's life in a way that nobody else ever could.

We touch lives in ways that many never even realize.

We see the best and worst in people

Nurses see the best and worst in people.

They are often the first to comfort a patient in pain and the last to leave their bedside when they are finally discharged. Nurses are often the unsung heroes of the medical profession, and their work is rarely given the credit it deserves.

It's essential for patients to know that nurses touch lives in many ways. They often go above and beyond the call of duty to make their patients feel comfortable and cared for.

In a world that can be so harsh and unforgiving, a kind word or gesture from a nurse can make all the difference.

Nursing is a calling, not just a job

Nursing is more than just a job - it's a calling.

It's the ability to offer somebody else hope in a time of darkness and to be there for them when nobody else is around. It's the ability to make a difference in somebody's life and offer them comfort when they need it the most.

So the next time you see a nurse, thank them for all they do. Thank them for touching your life in ways that you may never even realize. 

Thank them for being there when you need them the most and always putting your needs first.

The final word

Nursing is more than just a job; it's an act of service.

A nurse's dedication and compassion are unparalleled. You are the light in somebody's dark world and make a difference in people's lives every single day.

Words cannot express how much gratitude I have for all you do.

For all that WE do.

Comments / 4

Published by

I'm a freelance writer and a decades-long travel nurse. Writing about the travel nurse industry and healthcare.

San Antonio, TX
899 followers

More from Rick Martinez RN

Comments / 0