New Orleans, LA

Louisiana State Museum Presents: 'Becoming American in Creole New Orleans 1896–1949' with Darryl Barthe Jr.

Pierre St-Jean

NEW ORLEANS, LA — The Louisana State Museum will be hosting an online lecture with Dartmouth College history lecturer Darryl Barthé Jr, who will talk about his new book, “Becoming American in Creole New Orleans 1896–1949”.

The program will take place via Zoom on Thursday, August 12, from 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. CDT. It is free and open to the public, but prior registration is required.

Barthé Jr. is a writer and researcher who taught history and American politics at Berkeley College in Manhattan and the University of New Orleans. He also taught at the University of Sussex in Brighton, the University of Amsterdam and the University of Leiden.

The book mostly talked about the role of Louisiana Creoles in New Orleans after the Civil War, more known as the Reconstruction Era, up until the 20th century. In this webinar, Barthé Jr. discusses the book’s content along with an in-depth analysis of how the ethnic transformation of New Orleans was done during the Jim Crow era, along with its processes, voluntary associations, and social sodalities within.

In this webinar, Barthé will share his thoughts about the ethnic repression in the Creole community, which separated from both Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians. The repression will be his reasoning about how the Creole people in New Orleans separate themselves from the French (Cajun) and Spanish (Isleños) color lines.

He will also explain his views on “Creolization” and “Americanization,” the two main social processes which eventually shape the Creole identity and cultural expression in New Orleans and the surrounding area until the mid-20th century.

You can register at the link provided here: (https://forms.gle/X2Px4GwkTZp6a6xd7)

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