New York City, NY

New York Will Force Employers to Disclose Salaries in Job Postings

New York Culture

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Have you ever been frustrated after going through several rounds of job interviews and being offered comparatively low pay? And despite your attempts to negotiate it, the employer wouldn't budge?

- If only they listed the salary amount in the job post! - you may have shouted in frustration. - I would not have applied if I knew it was this low!

Well, you'll be happy to learn it will become a reality for New Yorkers soo. You may also feel upset it's not the case for other cities and states. Having that said, the NYC council's attempt to introduce more transparency into the hiring process may spark a state- and country-wide trend.

The Details

This NYC council voted on the matter on January 15, 2022, and the law comes into effect on May 15, 2022, as it takes 120 days for such laws to go into effect. You can read the details of the proceedings on the same website, but the wording of this law reads:

§ 2. Section 8-107 of the administrative code of the city of New York is amended by adding a new subdivision 32 to read as follows:
32. Employment; minimum and maximum salary in job listings. a. It shall be an unlawful discriminatory practice for an employment agency, employer, employee or agent thereof to advertise a job, promotion or transfer opportunity without stating the minimum and maximum salary for such position in such advertisement. In stating the minimum and maximum salary for a position, the range may extend from the lowest to the highest salary the employer in good faith believes at the time of the posting it would pay for the advertised job, promotion or transfer opportunity.

The 8-107 law also notes the following:

1. It only applies to companies employing 5 and more individuals.

2. It wouldn't apply to temporary workers hired for temporary positions.

I sincerely hope this wouldn't result in employers hiring New Yorkers as temps. As you can see, some small businesses that have only a few workers are also safe from this law.

The Reaction

The way people reacted was very different - naturally, some companies weren't very happy about this law. But the New York City Commission on Human Rights that will be enforcing it believes this change can help close the gender gap.

Conclusion

So, NYC's employers will no longer be able to wait till the very last moment to inform a potential employee of the salary they offer. It's excellent for many of us, as we can see what we're signing up for. Not to mention, I can see myself being desperate enough to accept the job offer even while being unhappy with the pay in the event I'm unemployed, and that will no longer be happening. If you ask me, this will make a big change in New Yorker's lives and compensation.

But maybe employees will come up with a way around it? Would they indicate wide salary ranges to mislead the applicants? We'll see once May rolls around. For now, it seems like a good idea, and it may actually help with the gender gap.

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