Tucson, AZ

Would You Like to Take Your Kids to a Museum in Tucson? Visit These 2 Interesting Museums

Kate Feathers

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There are plenty of museums to discover in Tucson, Arizona, from art galleries to history museums to science centers.

Not every museum is fun for children, though. Luckily, this article is all about the museums in Tucson that are great for children! They all offer many interesting exhibits that could catch your child's attention and enrich their mind while also teaching them a thing or two.

Without further ado, let's have a look at (number) museums in Tucson where you can take your child on a nice educational trip.

Children's Museum Tucson

First and foremost, there's a Children's Museum in Tucson. It's the perfect place for anyone with children who are under 10 years old as it offers multiple interactive exhibits (eleven in total).

Some of these exhibits include for example "Wee World", which is a great attraction for any child under 5, "Discovery Garden" or "Investigation Station" where children get to learn about science through very interactive activities.

To quote the website of the Children's Museum Tucson:

"Located in the historic Carnegie Library, CMT has 17,000 square feet space with 11 indoor exhibits and party rooms. It also includes a beautiful outdoor courtyard with an additional three exhibits and lots of space for kids to play and imagine. Our exhibits and programs are geared toward kids up to 10 years old. CMT was founded in 1986, and has been in this location since 1991."

The admission fee is 9 dollars per person, however, children under 1 year can enter the museum for free. There are also some discounts that you can check out! If you'd like to visit the museum and have a nice trip with your children in Tucson, go to 200 South 6th Ave in Tucson.

Gadsden-Pacific Division Toy Train Operating Museum

If your child is interested in trains, this might be the perfect place to take them to! The history of the Gadsden-Pacific Division Toy Train Operating Museum dates back to 1980 when a club of 25 people was founded. Over the years, this club has grown up to more than 130 members.

As the title suggests, the Gadsden-Pacific Division Toy Train Operating Museum in Tucson is all about model railroading and train exhibits. There are many miniature train layouts that the visitors get to explore. What's so fun about the exhibits is that you can operate them by pushing buttons located next to the layouts, which sounds like a great activity for any child interested in trains.

The website of the museum says:

"The GADSDEN-PACIFIC TOY TRAIN OPERATING MUSEUM is a charitable, not-for-profit 501 (C) (3) corporation dedicated to the hobby of model railroading by providing the public with an interactive museum of operating toy train layouts, displays and exhibits."

At the time of writing this article (29th May 2021), the museum is closed because of the Covid-19 pandemic. However, it re-opens on 5th September 2021, therefore you can visit it in the near future. The museum is located at 3975 N. Miller Ave. in Tucson.

When it comes to ticket prices, the museum can be entered for free. The museum manages to keep running thanks to donations and sales in the gift shop, so don't forget to donate or buy something if you'd like to support the Gadsden-Pacific Division Toy Train Operating Museum. You can buy toys and souvenirs in the shop, so you might find lots of things that children can enjoy there as well.

Final Thoughts

If you'd like to take your child to a museum as soon as the Covid-19 pandemic is over, don't hesitate to visit the two museums in Tucson mentioned above. They are both educational and interesting in their own way, and children might find them very entertaining.

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I'm a student of Languages & Comparative Literature who writes about relationships, feminism and personal growth. Discover more of my work: https://linktr.ee/clumsylinguist

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