California hits record-high temperatures making firefighter's jobs extremely difficult this summer

Josue Torres

Northern California is heating up, with a huge — and possibly record-breaking — heatwave expected from Sunday to Tuesday.

According to the National Weather Service, the strong warming trend will begin today and peak on Memorial Day, with temperatures in the mid-90s and triple digits in the hottest areas.

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Inland areas are under a heat advisory from noon to 9 p.m. Monday, according to the National Weather Service. The CDC recommended that people restrict intense outdoor activity during the hottest part of the day, not leave dogs or children unattended in cars, and remain hydrated.

A mild ocean wind, Mother Nature’s air conditioner, will keep temperatures in the 70s along the coast for the holiday weekend.

The heatwave occurs as a ridge of high pressure moving inland from the Pacific Ocean, bringing in a mass of stable air and compressing coastal fog.

“What happens during these high-pressure events is very stable air begins moving into the area, and we have that warm, dry air over the Central Valley and because of that difference in pressure it starts to make its way toward the coast,” Diaz explained. “Think of it like a blow dryer, that warm dry air comes in and it gets rid of that marine influence.” This is a major cause of concern for more wild fires.

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According to ISO, the state is better equipped to avoid the rotating blackouts that occurred last summer. They did warn, though, that the electricity grid in the country’s most populous state is still vulnerable to catastrophic heat waves, which might result in more disruptions.

As a high-pressure system rises over the region from Sunday to Wednesday, temperatures in inland California are likely to rise beyond 100 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.

To avoid heat exhaustion, officials advise citizens to stay hydrated, seek shade, and take pauses.

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