Salisbury, CT

Salisbury, Ct. is a small town with secrets

Jennifer Bonn

Salisbury Ct. is a small town with secrets

As you can read at https://www.ctvisit.com/listings/town-salisbury, Salisbury, Ct. is a small town nestled in The Berkshire Mountains in the Tri-state area where New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts touch borders. You can drive 15 minutes and be in another state. Salisbury is a beautiful spot where many people from New York City have summer homes, and the neighboring towns are all examples of typical New England towns, but Salisbury and the neighboring towns also hold some secrets.

The secrets include places to see, activities to do, and historical spots that you might miss if you were just passing through. As a native of the town, I can reveal a few of these secrets, and you can also read about them on this website https://newengland.com/today/travel/connecticut/salisbury-ct/.

Wikipedia is a great place to learn about some of the main spots in Salisbury. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury,_Connecticut

The Scoville Memorial Library is the public library in Salisbury, but it isn’t your typical library. It looks like a stone castle, and there is a huge bell in the tower that rings out the hour, day and night. Our house was right down the road so if I woke up during the night, I could listen to the bell to know what time it was. It is also one of the reasons I love to read so much. I spent many hours curled in one of the nooks and crannies reading. The restrooms were in the spookiest cellar I have ever seen, so of course, we had to go down there at least once per visit. The Scoville Memorial Library was established in 1803 and it was the first library to be open free of charge.

Across from the library, next to the town hall is an old watering fountain for horses and now for anyone who might become thirsty as they discover the town surrounding them.

The town was started in 1741 and was known for mining ore. The town center is a large circle of historical significance. The Congressional Meeting House built in 1749 is now the core of the town hall. Behind the town hall is a cemetery that started in 1750. The graves have beautiful poems and details of the people who lie beneath them. There is an unusual bronze sculpture from 1874 and an urn with the busts of eight small children on its handles. At the North end of the center is The White Hart Inn built in 1800.

If you travel behind the town center and head down Indian Cave Rd., you will see a vast forest with two entrances separated by a large field. The entrance to the left will lead you to Satre Hill where The Eastern Ski Jump Championships have been held since 1952. If you head down the entrance to the right, you will eventually see part of an Indian cave to your left. The Mohican Indians were in the area before the town was founded.

Salisbury is also the home for Lime Rock Park if you want to watch car racing. Paul Newman was a frequent visitor there.

Salisbury has several ponds and six lakes, and the Appalachian trail runs through the town. I learned to swim and skate at those lakes, and in the winter, locals come together to skate at Factory Pond, and gather around a bonfire and make s’mores.

I hope I have given you enough information to make you want to explore this town.

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Scoville library

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I am passionate about running, parenting, education, and self-help information. I enjoy writing articles that will offer readers the information needed to help them in some way. I recently retired from teaching French and Spanish for forty years. I run every day and have done all kinds of races from 5ks to ultra-marathons. I have three children and three grandchildren. I write for several magazines in my area, I am a contributor and in charge of the Pinterest board for a parenting magazine called Screamin Mamas, and I have a second book about to be released through Loving, Healing Press called 101 Tips to Ease Your Burdens.

Kennesaw, GA
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