San Jose, CA

San Jose gunman caught on rare video leaving home before shooting

Jano le Roux

Samuel Cassidy, the San Jose mass shooter, was recorded on CCTV placing a large duffel bag into his pickup peacefully early Wednesday, less than an hour before authorities claimed he massacred nine rail-yard workers. Cassidy went on the spree at his longstanding employer, San Jose’s VTA Light Rail Facility, around 6:30 a.m., killing nine people and injuring others before turning the gun on himself.

What exactly happened?

Samuel Cassidy, the San Jose mass shooter, was recorded on CCTV placing a large duffel bag into his pickup peacefully early Wednesday, less than an hour before authorities claimed he massacred nine rail-yard workers.

Cassidy comes out to his white Ford F-150, laying down the heavy bag before carefully loading it into the front passenger side, the footage reveals, wearing safety clothes with neon strips as well as a mask and headgear.

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=1s5771_0aFK5O6000
KPIX 5

He then circles back to the driver’s side, takes his time getting in, and drives away from his home in San Jose’s Ramblewood neighborhood.

Doug Suh, Cassidy’s next-door neighbor, submitted surveillance camera footage with KPIX 5 News, stating it showed Cassidy leaving approximately 5:40 a.m. Wednesday, which is when he usually leaves for work.

Cassidy went on the spree at his longstanding employer, San Jose’s VTA Light Rail Facility, around 6:30 a.m., killing nine people and injured others before turning the gun on himself, according to investigators.

Around the same moment, his house caught fire, necessitating the evacuation of the surrounding region. Agents discovered explosives, gasoline, and other weapons in his home, according to officials.

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=1u0pQW_0aFK5O6000
KPIX 5

The motivation for the slaughter has yet to be revealed by officials.

Suh, who lives across the street from him, characterized him as “lonely” and “weird,” adding that he never saw friends or family visit him.

Suh admitted to KPIX that he and his wife were afraid of him, stating, “I’d say hello and he’d just look at me without saying anything.”

Cassidy had worked for Valley Transportation Authority since at least 2012, first as a mechanic and then as a substation maintenance technician, according to KPIX.

According to public data from 2019, he received $160,000 in total pay and perks.

Comments / 0

Published by

Bringing you verified local facts big-news can't share, won't share, or are too afraid to share.

Los Angeles, CA
16690 followers

More from Jano le Roux

Comments / 0