Organic coffee grounds fertilizer

Gin Lee

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Coffee grounds/ using coffee grounds as a organic fertilizer/Gin Lee

Organic coffee grounds fertilizer

If you brew coffee and are also a gardener. Were you aware that you can make use of the brewed coffee grounds as a natural fertilizer? That's right! Used coffee grounds, as well as diluted leftover cold black coffee, is great for most plants.

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Sprinkling coffee grounds around the topsoil of cucumber plants/Gin Lee

Already brewed coffee grounds are packed full of potassium, magnesium, nitrogen, caffeine, calcium and phosphorus and I have found that they're a great plant food for root vegetable plants such as different varieties of potatoes, radishes, carrots, and turnips, as well as for other garden plants such as herbs, peppers, cucumbers, and broccoli also benefit from the already brewed coffee grounds. Just sprinkle the grounds around the topsoil and allow nature to do the rest of the work. Do this once a week, but sparingly. Always make sure that the coffee grounds aren't left in large clumps.

Coffee grounds change the pH level in the soil, so that's something that you'll have to be careful with. You can neutralize the coffee grounds by mixing them with eggshells to lower the acidic level.

Once this has been done, then the coffee grounds and eggshell fertilizer can be used on tomato plants. I don't advise sprinkling coffee grounds directly on the tomato plant's soil without neutralizing the coffee grounds first, because coffee grounds can sometimes be too acidic. Sprinkle about one cup of this mixture around the base of your tomato plants and onto the topsoil about once a week.

Coffee grounds can also be mixed in with compost piles to neutralize the grounds.

Adding coffee grounds to the soil doesn't only benefit your plants from nutritional standpoints, but it also helps aid in soil drainage and earthworms thrive on it too.

And don't forget that leftover cold coffee can also be used as plant food as well. Just dilute the pot of coffee down first with water before giving your plants a drink.

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It is within my mission, to ensure that readers will receive original and valuable news content. The content material in which will be written about a mass variety of topics. I find my inspiration in the art of design, illustrations, as well as writing content for viewers like you! As an author, designer, artist, animal rescuer, food blogger, organic gardener, freelance journalist, and contributor I strive to encourage my readers to learn about topics that they may not be fluent in, as well as share my common knowledge about important elements of interest. Because as circumstances have it I do live in an extraordinarily rural area; of which I'm proud to profess. Writing for NewsBreak is an enlightened, and enjoyable experience. It's been a collection of milestones for me. Concurrently, you (as well as I) have touched base on so many news levels, and we have all learned from the research I've done on a variety of topics. Although this is just a small token of my appreciation to all of my readers and followers, I want to say with a happy heart, and my arms wide open- Thank you for being you! And thank you for liking, subscribing, and following me! It means more to me than mere words can say!

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