Be Proud of and Appreciate Your Efforts

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There is a lot of stigma around hard work, which is deeply troubling. We live in a culture where it's often met with ridicule rather than praise, where your work ethic might as well be branded on your forehead as a do-gooder. But here's the thing; every person who opens their mouth to say "I'm too hardworking" has been lying to themselves for decades about the true meaning of strength. Here's why.

A good work ethic is about putting in the hours, trying your hardest, and pushing the limit to achieve a goal. It is about having the audacity to try something, to dream something up, and then do everything in your power to make it come true. Hard work is a virtue that shows you have determination, tenacity, and drive to exceed expectations. Without hard work, there would be no outstanding achievements, no Nobel Prize winners (or even Nobel Prize nominees), and certainly no inventors or pioneers of our time.

People who want to be great at what they do are the type of people who go above and beyond the call of duty and try to make a massive difference that their career needs. They may not have a ton of money, but they will work tirelessly in their chosen field until they get it right. You don't need millions of followers or followers in your area to prove you are doing something important or good. The proof is how dedicated you are and how much effort you put into something.

That being said, hard work is not easy. It takes time, patience, and perseverance. Most of the time, it's something that works itself out in the long term, but it feels like you've hit a dead-end during the process. It is easier to quit, give up, and say "what's the use" than to keep pushing forward. Making an effort can be draining, demoralizing, and feeling hopeless at times (at least until you reach your final goal).

"But I've heard of people who are just too hardworking, and they don't know where it's gotten them," you might rightfully think. But the truth is, these people haven't been working hard for a long time. After a certain period of time, their work ethic starts to show them in the form of great work and results that they can be proud of. It shows the world that they can make it.

It's essential for you to remember that real "hard work" takes hours, years, and even decades to show. It is not something that happens overnight. Most of us may be too hard-working to even notice how long it has taken for our hard work to show in the end. Your job is not about telling people how hard you have been working but rather showing them your accomplishments. There's nothing wrong with the people complaining about your work ethic, but they don't realize that if you're doing the work, stressing and worrying are part of the process.

If hard work brings great results in your career, do not be ashamed or try to hide that you are putting in effort towards anything. You should never feel pressured to take a picture of your desk and post it on Twitter as "proof" of all the hours you've been working. If someone is trying to call you out for working too hard, remember that they are the ones who have the problem. It's the people who try to make others feel bad about doing their best that don't get results in their career.

So what do you do when working hard, and a colleague asks how long it took for you to complete your task? Tell them that it took as long as is necessary, and let your work speak for itself.

So many people are taught that it's wrong to be hardworking, and we must do whatever it takes to prove them wrong. Don't be ashamed of being hardworking.

Be proud of your effort. It shows in your results, and there won't be a more effective way to prove this than with your grades, resumes, or impressive achievements. If you want to be great, get ready to be a hard worker.

I know it's tough to keep at it when things seem to be going nowhere, but don't let the fear of not being able to achieve your goals stop you. You are stronger than you think.

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