Watch as This 12-Foot-Long Python Slithers In Front of Two Kittens After Recently Being Found in a Family Home

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What is the going rate for the removal of a 2-man-long python from your home? One woman in Thailand recently found out. Posted Sep. 9, on Instagram, a recent video shows a massive python hanging out in the bathroom of a family's home. As the snake slithers, two tiny kittens watch from a short distance.

Watch footage of the incident below, shared by NowThisNews.

Luckily for this family, no one appeared to suffer from ophidiophobia, the "extreme, overwhelming fear of snakes." While the average garden snake would petrify many, coming face to face with a python is an entirely new ballgame. Surprisingly it is estimated that nearly 1/3rd of adults have ophidiophobia. [i] [ii]

Although pythons terrify many people, they are nonvenomous snakes. According to the Reptile Database, there are 40 different species of python. Pythons, with their triangular-shaped heads, are some of the world's largest snakes, many growing over 30 feet long. [iii]

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=43lTAk_0hxhhwfn00
Screenshot from public access video.Charnell Gilchrist

Many species of python are equipped with heat-sensing labial pits. These help the python to find warm-blooded prey. Some pythons feed on cold-blooded prey and do not possess the labial pits. They can be found in Africa, Asia, Australia, and Oceania, preferring warm, wet climates. [iv]

Ever wondered precisely how the python can move forward in a straight line? It's known as rectilinear progression movement. To accomplish this, pythons stiffen their ribs against the ground. They then lift their bellies to propel themselves forward. They aren't going anywhere too quickly, though. Research indicates they cannot go faster than 1 mph. [v]

The video below defines undulation and explains how it relates to a snake's movement.

References

[i] Cleveland Clinic, Ophidiophobia (Fear of Snakes), (2022)

[ii] FearOf.net, Fear of Snakes PHobia - Ophidiophobia, (2022)

[iii] Id.

[iv] Paul Donovan, Heat Pits Explained!, (Nov. 13, 2021)

[v] Snake Discovery, How Snakes Move! (They don't just slither!), (Jul. 3, 2020)

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