Couy Griffin Recently Attended a Meeting in Otero County

Daniella Cressman
"The Otero County Commission met Thursday for the first time since former Commissioner Couy Griffin was removed from office by court order earlier in the week in response to his participation in the attack on the U.S. Capitol." —Ryan Lowery

"Griffin’s nameplate and chair were absent as the two remaining commissioners called the regular meeting to order. Griffin, however, attended the meeting and spoke during the public comment session." —Ryan Lowery

Each speaker was given three minutes to address the commission. Griffin used the time to discuss two important items on the agenda: a contract extension for the county attorney and funding for a road—he also used the last minute he was allotted to address his removal from office.

"Each speaker was given three minutes to address the commission, and Griffin used his time to discuss two items on the agenda: funding for a road and a contract extension for the county attorney. But Griffin also used the final minute of his allotted time to address his removal from office, telling those in attendance that his computer was seized by county officials before he was notified that state District Judge Francis J. Mathew had ruled Tuesday that Griffin could no longer serve in his elected position — or any other for the rest of his life." —Ryan Lowery

Griffin acknowledged that being removed from office is extremely difficult for him: he feels that he has lost a certain amount of respect he once garnered and that this is the most trying time of his life.

“This has been the hardest time of my life, not that I’m trying to get anybody’s sympathy. But it’s been very difficult for me...I think that it’s just very difficult that I don’t have the respect of being able to be out by Friday without having the county sheriff or the sheriff’s department standing guard.” —Couy Griffin

The case against Griffin was initially filed in March of this year—three New Mexicans argued that Griffin should be removed from his elected position for violating the United States Constitution, specifically due to his participation in the 2021 riot on January 6.

"The case against Griffin was initially filed in March by three New Mexico residents who argued Griffin should be removed from his elected position for violating the U.S. Constitution, specifically because of his participation in the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol. Griffin represented himself during a twoday bench trial last month in District Court in Santa Fe. In Tuesday’s decision, Mathew ruled that Griffin had broken his oath to support the Constitution when he participated in the attack in Washington, D.C., violating Section 3 of the 14th Amendment." —Ryan Lowery

Griffin plans to appeal the ruling.

"Griffin said he plans to appeal the ruling and that during the appeals process, he won’t be representing himself. Instead, he will be hiring 'some great legal minds.'" —Ryan Lowery

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