480 Soldiers Destroyed By Crocodiles In World War II

Cadrene Heslop

Did you know crocodiles played a role in World War II battles? According to historical journalists, this is the case.

An army of 480 Japanese soldiers passed on because of an attack by saltwater crocodiles. This event happened during the Battle of Ramree Island during World War II. In 1942, during World War II, the Japanese Imperial Army captured Ramree Island. This location is off the Burma coast, 70 miles south of Akyab, now called Sittwe. (source)

Ramree Island was critical for success in the war. Allies tried to retake it in 1945 to build airbases for their mainland campaign. The British attack drove about 1000 enemy soldiers into the mangrove swamps. The research labeled what happened next as "the oddest incident in the history of warfare." (source)

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=0YhBYO_0i3HdUe100
Photo by Rae Wallis on Unsplash

The defeated Japanese soldiers ignored the appeals of the British. They left their base and went into the swamp. Many succumbed to the bites of many tropical marsh animals. They also lacked drinking water and food. There was one other danger lurking in the swamp. (source)

One night British troops heard panicked noises from the marshes. At the time, the troops did not know what caused the excitement among the Japanese. But we know now. The swamp was home to many large reptilian animals. Some say saltwater crocodiles can grow up to 20 feet long and weigh 2,000 pounds. Even mid-sized ones are large. The reports say the reptile attacked 1000 Japanese soldiers, and only 520 survived. (source)

What do you think?

Share your thoughts in the comments, and feel free to share this article on social media and with your friends and family.

*Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. This article got written using accredited media reports.*

Comments / 32

Published by

News you care about most. Gift Coffee Drinks to The Creator with the below link :)

N/A
16210 followers

More from Cadrene Heslop

Comments / 0