Winter Storm Watch and Advisories in Effect for North Dakota: Wind Driven Snowfall Expected

Bryan Dijkhuizen

Patchy fog continues to blanket sections of northern and central North Dakota, however, conditions have significantly improved in most areas where the denser fog had been present.

The Jamestown region had a small dusting of light snow early in the day, according to reports.

Although we are not expecting much in the way of precipitation until later this afternoon and particularly this evening, we would not be shocked if a few flakes were pushed out in random spots under the thick low-level stratus deck this afternoon.

As a result, flurries were added to the majority of places covered by this layer, which includes the extreme northwestern corner of North Dakota, down to the Bismarck area, and farther east.

Patchy fog continues to blanket sections of northern and central North Dakota, however, conditions have significantly improved in most areas where the denser fog had been present.

The Jamestown region had a small dusting of light snow early in the day, according to reports.

Although we are not expecting much in the way of precipitation until later this afternoon and particularly this evening, we would not be shocked if a few flakes were pushed out in random spots under the thick low-level stratus deck this afternoon.

As a result, flurries were added to the majority of places covered by this layer, which includes the extreme northwestern corner of North Dakota, down to the Bismarck area, and farther east.

The strongest band of snow is most expected to fall from the Turtle Mountains region down the James River Valley tonight evening and into Friday morning, according to forecasters.

Synoptic scale forces should result in widespread snowfall totals of more than 6 inches in this region, according to the forecast.

Deterministic guidance, on the other hand, seems to have a number of components for mesoscale banding, which might result in a narrow band of much greater numbers.

Lighter snow accumulations will occur to the west of the heavier snow, but there will also be worries about the sort of precipitation that falls. From the northwest to south-central North Dakota, freezing rain is the most common precipitation type, according to the majority of CAMs and the NBM.

Although maximum temperatures aloft are only expected to reach just above freezing, a deep isothermal layer with temperatures close to slightly above freezing could enable hydrometeors to completely melt before reaching the surface.

There is also the possibility of a reduction in ice crystal creation while in the atmosphere. A large region of ice buildup is expected to develop between the northwest border of the state and Lake Oahe.

Even while there may still be some modest adjustments to the west or east in terms of the heaviest snow accumulations and ice risk, the ensemble agreement is continuing to strengthen.

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