Politics in the United States Today

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Change in America?

Politics in the United States Today

A New Political Party

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A new political party is now being formed in the United States. On Wednesday, July 27, 2022, a Washington Post op-ed published the following statement made in unison by Andrew Yang, Christine Todd Whitman, and David Jolly, “Political extremism is ripping our nation apart, and the two major parties have failed to remedy the crisis. Today’s outdated parties have failed by catering to the fringes. As a result, most Americans feel they aren’t represented.” This new political party has taken on the name Forward in an attempt to bring Republicans and Democrats together in what they call the “moderate, common-sense majority.”

The Forward party will hold its first national convention next summer and will also seek ballot access to seek candidates for the 2024 election.

These three individuals have chosen to merge their political organizations together in what they believe will be for the betterment of the United States of America. Andrew Yang was previously a Democratic presidential candidate and a New York mayoral candidate as well. He is now listed as an Independent. Christine Todd Whitman was a former Republican governor of New Jersey and David Jolly is a former Republican congressman from Florida.

Some major issues are at the forefront of the new Forward Party. A moderate approach to the issues of gun control, abortion, and climate change are some of the current goals. In addition, Ranked-choice voting is being considered a new option in voting. “In RCV, voters get to do more than simply vote for one candidate. They rank the candidates in the order they prefer, and voters can typically rank as many candidates as they would like to. So if five candidates are running, voters can rank them 1–5. The system gives voters a way to express their views about a number of candidates, not just one.” Other changes include the end of “gerrymandering”, nationwide protection for voting rights, and open primaries.

Andrew Yang stated on “New Day”, “Sixty-two percent of Americans now want a third party, a record high because they can see that our leaders aren’t getting it done, and when you ask about the policy goals, the fact is the majority of Americans actually agree on really even divisive issues. The most divisive issues of the day like abortion or firearms — there’s actually a commonsense coalition position on these issues and just about every other issue under the sun.”

The Forward party is planning “a national building tour this fall to hear from voters and begin laying the groundwork for expanded state-by-state party registration and ballot access, relying on the combined nationwide network of the three organizations. Legal recognition is the goal “in 15 states by the end of 2022, twice that number in 2023, and in almost all U.S. states by the end of 2024.” The three new Forward members have stated, “Most third parties in the United States history failed to take off, either because they were ideologically too narrow or the population was uninterested.” A Gallup poll from last year cited the need for a third party in the United States of America.

Whitman, Jolly, and Yang commented, “Americans of all stripes — Democrats, Republicans, and independents — are invited to be a part of the process, without abandoning their existing political affiliations, by joining us to discuss building an optimistic and inclusive home for the politically homeless majority.”

Whatever happens with politics in the United States of America, it is clear there is a huge divide. The solutions will not be simple and our futures as Americans is surely at the forefront.

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