Food Price Hikes: Stats Show No Break For NY

Bridget Mulroy

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Food prices on the rise, shortages anticipated, low-income families at risk.(Zephyr18/iStock)

In case you haven’t noticed, food has become more expensive than ever before.

While inexpensive food is still obtainable, consumers are discovering the power of getting what you pay for. 

The quality of food available has become spectrumized into what is edible, and what is not/what shouldn’t be eaten. Prices reflect this – locally grown seasonal vegetables, like corn, are more expensive than a microwave meal you can heat up in under 5 minutes.

Unfortunately, the prices of lower-quality and less healthy meal options remain consistently inexpensive, whereas organic fruit, vegetable, meat, and grain prices are soaring.

As of July 2022, food prices have increased by 10.9% since 2020. This percentage is showing no signs of shrinking or even plateauing. This statistic will be updated again on September 25, 2022, as food price reports are not seasonally adjusted by region, they’re a broad range of prices from all over the country.

Food everywhere, take-away as well as groceries, are becoming worth their weight in gold. With groceries being ranked equal in cost to ordering food for take-out, Americans have their hands – and wallets – tied behind their backs.

This raises the greatest concern of all…

Low-income families were already struggling to pay for groceries. For ages in the United States, food assistance programs have helped these people afford food and access to basic nutrition. 

Rising food prices now mean assistance benefits are becoming less likely to bridge the gap between poverty and nutrition. 

Today, 38 million Americans benefit from food assistance programs in the United States. This number is expected to climb as prices rise and quality food becomes more difficult to source.

This issue delves deeper than supply and demand. The United States will no longer be considered a great global power if it can't feed its people – or if the only food available is toxic.

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