Earthy Delights with Plants with Benefits

Bee Better Naturally with Helen Yoest

Asparagus, a shape that speaks for itself.

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The 17th-century English herbalist, Nicholas Culpepper, wrote that asparagus "stirs up lust in man and women." And if you were a male in 19th-century France, your prenuptial dinner included three of these sexy spear courses. They couldn't have known it at the time, but asparagus is rich in folic acid, which is said to boost histamine production necessary for the ability of both men and women to reach the big O.

As early as 200 B.C., Cato educated others on growing asparagus. Later Romans, including Pliny the Elder, Julius Caesar, and Agustus, held the wild variety in high esteem. In the meantime, the ancient Egyptians were cultivating it, selecting out even bigger and better types.

In Ayurvedic medicine, a system of traditional and alternative medicine found in ancient Indian culture and widely practiced today was recommended for the treatment of gastric ulcers, dyspepsia (indigestion), and as a galactagogue (promoting breast milk production) enhancer. And it was reported to also help with nervous disorders; perhaps the sexual overtones of this phallic-shaped vegetable lightened the mood.

Foods we consume can directly impact our sex life, whether from affecting our health, altering brain chemistry, increasing energy, or reducing stress levels. Then some foods simply suggest sex, and these cannot be ignored.

The asparagus that first became the suggestive aphrodisiac was the wild asparagus and not the cultivated we eat and grow today. Both, however, look like little, earthy erections. Imagine one's reaction when first coming upon a field of wild asparagus during early spring? Words fail me.

Mushrooms, dangerously sexy!

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In general, Mushrooms are somewhat of an enigma, often sprouting up fully-grown overnight as if by magic. As for taste, they're either loved or loathed - commonly because of fear of possible poisoning. Many toxic look-alikes in the wild made it dangerous to just pop a 'shroom in our mouths.

We humans often go to great lengths to fire up the libido, though, and there are some mushrooms out there that do just that.

Like them or not, mushrooms get around. The Hebrews believed that God provided the Israelites (Exodus 16:1-36 with "manna from heaven." We humans often go to great lengths to fire up the libido, though, and there are some mushrooms out there that do just that.

Liked them or not, mushrooms get around. The Hebrews believed that God provided cultures thought of mushrooms as gifts the gods left after a lightning strike, which isn't far from the truth. Mushrooms can grow from the ashes of a fire, as was evident after the Mt. St. Helens eruption in 1980, An 8th century. B.C. Greek vase depicts unusual mushrooms at the feet of one of the most famous Centaurs, Nessu; it was believed that this potent fungus enhanced the centaurs' antics.

Although some fungi have more claim as aphrodisiacs than others, I'm interested in beneficial varieties that can be easily bought or grown. Take the morel, whose aphrodisiac effect comes mostly from its visual stimulation. Morels were originally named Phallus esculentus by Carl Linnaeus in 1753. Just one look, and you can see where he was going with that. Sadly, the morel was renamed in 1801 to Morchella esculenta.

Arugula, aka: the rocket...enough said!

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Though the bitter tang of arugula's oak shaped leaves might be too spicy for your palate, its aphrodisiac effects might just have you reaching for the second bite anyway.

Native to the Mediterranean region, arugula, also called the rocket, was historically eaten during meals for the natural aphrodisiac benefits. It was documented as early as the 1st-century A.D. by Pliny the Elder and Dioscorides, who cited its ability to increase libido, along with its other health benefits. Arugula was thought to clear the mind while increasing power and energy. Virgil wrote of it: "The rocket excites the sexual desire of drowsy well-endowed god of fertility and protector of gardens and domestic animals.

Arugula is an excellent source of chlorophyll. It can cleanse and energize the blood by providing oxygen to all parts of the body, including your genitals. Today it's believed that the most important benefit of arugula is improving the quality of blood. It contains high amounts of vitamins K and P, which enhance the liver's function and absorb calcium. Although arugula is not a direct libido enhancer as the Greeks and Romans supposed, it is rich in A, C, Iron, trace minerals, and other antioxidants that protect against cancer and block libido-reducing environmental containments from our bod the bitter tyang of arugula's oak shaped leaves might be too spicy for your palate, its aphrodisiac effects might just havew you reaching for the second bit anyway.

Native to the Mediterranean region, arugla also called rocket, was historically eaten duing meals for ths natural sphrodisiac benefits. It was documented as early as the 1st centry A.D. by Pliny the Elder and Dioscorides, who cited its ability to increase libido, along with its other health benefits. Arugula was thought to clear the mind while increasing power and energy. Virgil worte of it: "The rocket excites the sexual desire of drowsy well-endowed god of fertility and protector of gardens and domestic animals.

Arugula is an excellent source of chlorophyll, it can cleanse and energize the blood by profiding oxygen to all parts of teh body, including your genitals. Today it;s believed that the most important benefit of arugula is improving the quality of blood. It contains high amounds of vitiamines K and P, which enhance the function of the liver and absorb calcium. Althought arugula is not a direct libido enhancer as the Greeks and Romans supposed, it is rich in A, C, Iron, plus trace minerals and other antioxidents that not only protect against cancer, but also block libido-recucing environmental containments from our body..

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Seriously? All it takes for a man's arousal is the sight of a carrot?! Maybe we should use carrots more for decorations around the house - ornaments on the Christmas tree, for a pull-cord from a ceiling fan light, and sitting in a clear vase on top of the television. Women should start a new tradition of sending your man a bouquet of carrots for no particular reason other than you want to love him and for him to love on you, but he doesn't have to know that!

Archaeological evidence of the wild carrot dates back to Mesolithic times - 10,000 years ago. There are indications that the gathered seeds were used for medicinal purposes.

The phallus-shaped carrot, albeit rather pointy, has been associated with aphrodisiac stimulations since ancient times. Middle Eastern royalty used this vegetable as inspiration and to aid in seduction.

The Greeks referred to the carrot as a philtron, meaning a love potion or love charm, from Philos, meaning loving. Dioscorides, the 1st-century A.D. physician, and botanist wrote that the root was an aphrodisiac, among its many medicinal benefits. The Romans also believed in the carrot's aphrodisiac attributes. Carrots were common in the Roman garden, where the root and seed were thought to increase the libido

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