The World AeroPress Coffee Championship

Aron Solomon

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credit: Aron Solomon, World AeroPress Championship, Montreal

On Thursday late afternoon, the World AeroPress Championship took place in Montreal and I’m still caffeinated.

For those unfamiliar with this revolutionary way of making coffee, the AeroPress is a simple device that allows you to brew coffee quickly and easily. It was created by Alan Adler, inventor of the Frisbee and other products, and has been used by baristas around the world for its ability to produce rich, smooth cups of coffee in 30 seconds or less. The AeroPress is easy to use: put ground coffee into the chamber at the top, add hot water then push down on the plunger until all of the liquid has passed through into your mug below. There are two ways to brew using an AeroPress: standard and inverted (see below).

The AeroPress was created in 2005 by Aerobie, Inc., a company known for its flying products such as Frisbees and boomerangs. The idea for this new coffee maker had been brewing for about 20 years and was finally put into production after being awarded a patent in 2005.

The AeroPress revolutionized coffee making by being simple, quick, easy to use and clean, cheap, and portable. It's also known as a "no-mess" method because there is no filter needed!

Aerobie, Inc. is the creator of both the original AeroPress and Frisbee (I'll bet you didn't know THAT!). The company was founded in Palo Alto, California in 1972 by Alan Adler. The original AeroPress was invented by Alan Adler in 2005 after he had trouble making good coffee with a French press at home; Adler wanted to create a simpler way for people to brew coffee that would produce less sediment than other brewing methods.

The AeroPress revolutionized coffee making by being simple, quick, easy to use and clean, cheap, and portable. It's also the perfect travel companion—you can pack it up with you anywhere.

The name AeroPress was inspired by pressurized air. It's a combination of the words "aerial" and "press," both of which refer to the act of pressing something.

The trademark for AeroPress is held by Aerobie, Inc., which produces flying discs—the kind used in frisbee games—and other recreational products.

The goal of the AeroPress was to create the perfect cup of coffee, or espresso like beverage, in 30 seconds or less.

The AeroPress is a portable coffee maker that uses air pressure to brew coffee and other hot beverages quickly. It has been around since 2005 and has become very popular because it produces superior results at home or on-the-go.

The coffee maker is small enough so that you can pack it in your bag when traveling but still big enough to make two cups worth of delicious filter drip style coffee or espresso (if you're feeling fancy). It's also easy to use once you get familiar with it!

The AeroPress is renowned for its ability to brew a full-flavored cup of coffee in mere seconds. The AeroPress has been used at many barista competitions around the world, including:

  • World Barista Championships
  • Brewers Cup
  • US Coffee Championships
  • UK Coffee Championships
  • And, of course, today’s AeroPress-focused World Championship

There are two ways to brew with an AeroPress; "standard" and "inverted".

The inverted method is the more popular and precise way of using an AeroPress. It involves inverting the device and placing it on top of your cup, so that you can access its plunger through a hole on the side. This lets you ensure that all grounds are evenly saturated with water, leading to a more consistent brew.

Inverted brewing also makes for easier cleaning and better portability—you can pop it in your bag without worrying about grinding up any loose grounds inside.

A slightly wet paper filter creates a smooth cup of coffee that lacks bitterness.

The AeroPress is unique in the world of coffee brewing because of its filter. Most other methods use metal filters that are relatively permanent, but the paper filter in an AeroPress is completely removable. This means that you can taste your coffee without any aftertaste, making it perfect for anyone who dislikes bitterness or smells and tastes they find unpleasant.

The inverted method produces a cup with less acidity than standard brewing methods, which makes it ideal for people who want a smoother cup with less bite to it. However, if you do not mind strong bittersweet flavors then regular pressing will give you more flavor out of your beans by extracting more oils from each batch.

Both methods produce similar tasting coffee, but inverted brewing allows for more precision because you can stop pressing whenever you want. The standard method is a little more forgiving as it's hard to screw up if you're following the instructions on your AeroPress package.

The AeroPress is a coffee maker that lets you make delicious, rich coffee anywhere. It's portable, easy to use and inexpensive. Here are some other features. Done well, AeroPress produces a smooth, rich cup of coffee, which is why it has devotees all over the world.

One of them is Lauren Scardella, a New Jersey lawyer and AeroPress fan, who admits:

“A lot of lawyers are fueled by coffee. If we’re going to drink it, we might as well love it, which is why AeroPress is an easy way to make outstanding coffee anywhere.”

A lot of AeroPress devotees turned up at the Montreal event, which was a blast. While we had near-monsoon conditions outside, the St. Henri micro-roastery that held the event did a fantastic job.

The smell of a coffee roastery with the best AeroPress makers in the world doing their thing is beyond my ability to describe. Suffice it to say that while this was far from the first coffee event I’ve ever attended, it was among the best and best-smelling.

Personally, I don’t make AeroPress at home. I use a beautifully simple Hario V60 setup which produces very good coffee every single time. All I need to do i stick to my coffee/water ratios. But after watching the AeroPress experts, I’m very tempted to work it into my coffee life at home.

About Aron Solomon

A Pulitzer Prize-nominated writer, Aron Solomon, JD, is the Chief Legal Analyst for Esquire Digital and 24-7 Abogados. He has taught entrepreneurship at McGill University and the University of Pennsylvania, and was elected to Fastcase 50, recognizing the top 50 legal innovators in the world. Aron has been featured in Forbes, CBS News, CNBC, USA Today, ESPN, TechCrunch, The Hill, BuzzFeed, Fortune, Venture Beat, The Independent, Fortune China, Yahoo!, ABA Journal, Law.com, The Boston Globe, NewsBreak, and many other leading publications.

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Aron Solomon, JD, is the Chief Legal Analyst for Esquire Digital, who has taught entrepreneurship at McGill University and the University of Pennsylvania, and was elected to Fastcase 50, recognizing the top 50 legal innovators in the world.

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