Campbell County in top healthy counties in Kentucky for 2021

Anita Durairaj

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It's official! Rankings from countyhealthrankings show that Campbell County is ranked 9th healthiest overall among all 120 Kentucky counties for 2021.

The website countyhealthrankings takes into account the length of life, quality of life, and health factors such as health behaviors, clinical care, social and economic factors and physical environment to compute the rankings.

Campbell County residents enjoy an average life expectancy of 77.4 years of age. Only 18% of residents consider themselves to be in poor physical health. Obesity accounts for 35% of the population and 20% of residents smoke. Contrast this data with that of the least healthiest county in Kentucky, Breathitt County.

Breathitt County is ranked #120 in Kentucky. The average life expectancy is 69.6 years and 32% of the population consider themselves to be in poor health. Obesity accounts for 40% of the population and at least 31% of the population smokes.

Obesity may be tied to physical inactivity and lack of access to exercise opportunities. In Campbell County, only 25% of residents are physically inactive while 95% have access to exercise opportunities. In Breathitt County, 36% of residents are physically inactive and only 57% have access to exercise opportunities. What a stark difference between the healthiest county and the least healthy county in Kentucky!

US News also did a study of the healthiest communities and overall Campbell County has a health score of 54/100 which is still above the state average of 36/100 and the U.S. average of 48/100.

There are many different factors that affect the health of a county and Campbell County's strong points are its education, economy, infrastructure and environment. It's weak points are community vitality (voter participation and home ownership rate), food and nutrition and equity (racial disparity, premature deaths, and segregation).

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Trained as a scientist with a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Cincinnati. My writing is diverse and features topics on science, history, entertainment, and current events as it relates to life and living in the United States.

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