Archeologists Discovered an Ancient Bird That Was Given to Egyptian Gods

Andrei Tapalaga

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Researchers analyzing the ancient birdPhoto byHistory of Yesterday

Ancient Egyptians used to bury mummified birds in their tombs as offerings to gods like Horus, Ra, and Thot. In actuality, the Egyptian mummies were buried with millions of killed birds. But until this time, it was not obvious if the birds were wild creatures or domesticated, like cats. Birds had a significant role in the ancient Egyptian civilization.

These birds were untamed, wild animals living in the wild before they dug their tunnels, according to recent research that looked at the chemical makeup of these birds. How the Egyptians were able to catch so many birds is an intriguing feature and a subject that is frequently asked.

“It’s an intense debate. If these birds were raised on an industrial scale this would have a significant economic impact, but if they were hunted this would mean a massive ecological burden on the bird population,”

The researchers were able to solve the mystery with the aid of the birds' bones and eating habits. The experts also inspected the embalmed skins of 20 ibises and other birds at the Musée des Confluences in Lyon. A varied diet evolved.

It was not a diet that an animal could have survived on while being kept in captivity.

The study's results suggest that birds of prey regularly ventured outside of that area since ibises were probably a permanent local population in the Nile Valley. However, compared to the Egyptians who mummified the animals, they did it more regularly in search of sustenance.

The researchers also found the bones of birds at various stages of development, which may indicate that they were in some manner kept in captivity. Also mentioned in certain writings from that time period is this practice.

A 2019 study proposed that they were migratory birds that were briefly domesticated, however there is evidence of wild bird hunting in ancient Egyptian art.

The most recent investigation indicates that the birds were wild. Experts concluded that the Egyptians had a sophisticated hunting network based on the fact that they captured millions of such raptors and ibises.

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