Historical Native American artifacts returned to the Mniconjou Lakota Tribe

Amber Alexandria

https://img.particlenews.com/image.php?url=0rDPRq_0cNEx5NT00
Lakota Elders, all with a family connection to Spotted Elk, accepting the Chief’s pistol and knife.Thomaston Place Auction Galleries

Earlier this month, the Mniconjou Lakota Tribe received donations of a pistol and knife belonging to Chief Spotted Elk (1826-1890).

Chief Spotted Elk was killed in the 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre in South Dakota. The image above are of Lakota Elders who all share an ancestral connection to Chief Spotted Elk.

Thomaston Place Auction Galleries, a Maine-based auction company, handled the transfer of these valuable artifacts. The pistol and knife were donated to the Mniconjou Lakota Tribe by an anonymous client who wanted to return these important possessions back to the tribe.

"We're honored to support the return of these historic artifacts;" noted Thomaston Place Auction Galleries owner and auctioneer Kaja Veilleux. "Our client, a collector and dedicated student of Native American history, is thrilled to see them back home where they belong and where they can be preserved for future generations." 

One among Chief Spotted Elk's valuables was a Smith & Wesson Schofield Second Model 45-caliber single action pistol, which was eventually discovered in Geronimo-Mangas Caves (Canada). It comes with documents from Deborah Spotted Tail Elk, the Chief's great-great-granddaughter, proving that this firearm belonged to him.

Chief Spotted Elk handcrafted his personal knife with a 19th century blade, stag elk handle, and brass fittings as part of the Ghost Dance tradition. After the Wounded Knee massacre, a soldier retrieved this piece from the Chief Spotted Elk's frozen body.

"We're honored to support the return of these historic artifacts;" noted Thomaston Place Auction Galleries owner and auctioneer Kaja Veilleux. "Our client, a collector and dedicated student of Native American history, is thrilled to see them back home where they belong and where they can be preserved for future generations." 

In 1874, Spotted Elk was appointed hereditary chief of the Mniconjou Sioux. He took part in the Indian Wars of 1875-1876, most notably the Battle of Little Big Horn, and in the 1876 exodus to Canada.

When the Tribe returned to the United States, they were assigned to the Wounded Knee Creek Reservation.

With the rise of the "Ghost Dance," of which Chief Spotted Elk was a proponent, and the death of Geronimo in 1890, the leader identified by U.S. soldiers as "Big Foot" was thought to be the final major threat from the Sioux—which the Army responded by massacring them all in their winter camp.

This is original content from NewsBreak’s Creator Program. Join today to publish and share your own content.

Comments / 1

Published by

Journalist. Follow Me To Read Relevant And Interesting News Articles From All Over The US!

Tampa, FL
200 followers

More from Amber Alexandria

Comments / 0