The Rise of Black Friday: A Day of High Shopping Activity and Mental Health Concerns

Alejandro Betancourt

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The day after Thanksgiving is now known as Black Friday. It's a day of high shopping activity and high retail traffic. It was the cheapest day to buy goods from stores that were in debt. But, this tradition has been dying out due to the rise of online shopping.

In recent years, retailers have been opening earlier on the day to capitalize on the sale. This has put a strain on workers because they must work harder and longer hours without rest or breaks for one whole week.

Black Friday was around for over 200 years before America even existed as a nation. The Black Friday origin was coined around the post-revolutionary war. It referred to a day of heavy financial losses for merchants and businesses.

Black Friday started to become popular in the 1980s. Retailers started opening earlier on Black Friday and starting their post-Thanksgiving sales early. The term Black Friday led to new opportunities for both shoppers and business owners. Still, it attracted a lot of negative attention surrounding working conditions for employees and their mental health.

This has prompted companies like Target Corp (TGT) and Walmart (WMT) to provide all employees with extra paid-time-off due to their long hours. Hoping it will allow them more quality time at home or other activities that can ease stress.

Since 2010 stores have been opening even earlier than before. Starting at midnight or shortly after, putting more strain on workers due to having longer shifts over many consecutive days during Black Friday week.

Black Friday, The Day of Sales, or A Day for Riots?

Black Friday is a day that inspires excellent enthusiasm among shoppers, but it also has negative consequences.

Shoppers are often so excited about Black Friday deals that they forget to care for their safety, leading to riots. The prices are so good at some stores that people will camp outside overnight for them, leading to violence and fights.

Shoppers should think about their safety and that of others. They should also be prepared for the possibility that Black Friday deals may not always actually provide them with great value due to factors like shipping costs, size issues, or other cost-related problems.

Black Friday is one of the most popular shopping days in America. Still, it can lead to crowds becoming very aggressive as they compete for limited stock. It's a day where shoppers must remember to keep calm and safe as part of Black Friday shopping survival tips that will help save lives along the way.

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Why Black Friday Is So Important For Retailers

Black Friday is a day that retailers have been waiting for all year. It falls on the fourth Thursday of November, and it's the busiest shopping day of the year.

The name Black Friday came from how stores would be so busy on this day that they would have to work through the night, hence their designation as "black" days. Stores are said to be "in the black" when their sales for a given day exceed their expenses. This is also how we get our expression "in the black."

Black Friday is also considered the unofficial beginning of the Christmas shopping season, and it's an important event because consumers use Black Friday as an opportunity to buy gifts they may not think about otherwise.

Retailers hope that Black Friday will help them gain more customers throughout the year since most shoppers wait until Black Friday before making significant purchases. This includes both online and in-store shopping. As expected, retailers often offer special discounts on this day so people can save money while doing what they love - shopping!

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Los Angeles, CA
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